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Events

Vigil for Yemen: Every Saturday 11:00 am to 12:30 pm
Ongoing with Social Distancing!

Many thanks to Felton Davis and the Catholic Worker Movement for maintaining this vigil to keep a public focus on U.S. support for Saudi Arabia in the ongoing war in Yemen and its impact.

Vigil will continue on Saturday mornings, 11:00 am to 12:30 pm, outside Tompkins Square Park (Avenue ‘A’ & St. Marks Place). Restrictions on public gatherings continue, but the police have not interfered with our small group, and we do stand at least six feet apart. There’s room for a few more at Tompkins, but if more than ten people want to vigil for Yemen, please feel free to stop by Maryhouse, (55 E 3rd St, b/t 1st Ave & 11th St , East Village, Manhattan) to pick up signs and choose another location.

E-mail davisfelton3@yahoo.com for future messages, updates on what’s happening in Yemen, and plans for response.


Every Thursday, 5:30-6:30 pm:
Vigil: “Women in Black”: Justice for Palestine

Every Thursday, 5:30–6:30 pm (weather permitting)

Join the Women in Black Vigil Union Square (on the little traffic island at 14th St & Broadway)
Express your outrage at the continuing siege as well as the U.S. policy toward Israel-Palestine that allows the blockade to continue.
Both women and men are welcome to participate. Learn more about the Women in Black Vigil.

E-mail is.pales@brooklynpeace.org for local contact information for New York Women in Black

Poverty Amidst Pandemic:
A Moral Response to COVID-19
Save the Date: Sat 6/20

Please join us in signing this petition (sponsored by MoveOn)

Save the Date: Sat June 20! The Mass Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington will be the largest digital gathering of poor, dispossessed and impacted people, faith leaders, and people of conscience

Read message below which we received from
The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival:

Beloved community,

The night before he was brutally shot down on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis on April 4, 1968, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. preached “Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point…either we go up together or we go down together.” Fifty two years later, in the midst of this COVID-19 pandemic and the poverty that preceded it, and is now deepening and spreading because of it, the truth of this statement still reverberates.

Epidemics emerge along the fissures of our society, reflecting not only the biology of the infectious agent, but patterns of marginalization, exclusion and discrimination. We are seeing that our society is only as healthy as our sickest person, our country is only as secure as the least secure homeless family, low-wage worker, indebted student, or uninsured person. Times such as these require that we come together in bold, new ways and build a moral fusion movement that has everybody in, nobody out.

Exactly one year before his assassination, Rev. Dr. King addressed the nation from Riverside Church in New York City about the interlocking injustices of racism, poverty and militarism. The Poor People’s Campaign emerged as a strategy to confront these ills, led by the poor and dispossessed who “have little to lose” coming “to take action together.” Dr. King asserted, “…the whole structure of American life must be changed.”

Today, the structure of American life is indeed changing as we respond to the double pandemic of poverty and COVID-19. There are record numbers joining the ranks of the unemployed; hospitals and morgues are overflowing while the streets are empty; and many of the workers who have been deemed essential and mandated to work are those being paid the lowest wages, with the least worker protections.

We see a health care system on the brink after decades of budget cuts, privatization, and a focus on profits over patients and public health. We see, in stark reality, the truth that 140 million people in America are either already poor or one health care crisis or missed paycheck away from poverty, nearly half of the U.S. population.

In times such as these, we cannot be silent anymore! We must take action together and become a “new and unsettling force in our complacent national life.”

Click here to learn more about who was left out of the stimulus bill, read our article, “The Evil Tucked In to the $2 Trillion Coronavirus Stimulus Bill” in this week’s TIME Magazine, read “Plagues Expose the Foundations of Injustice” in Sojourners, and share this Poverty Amidst Pandemic Litany as we approach the religious celebrations of Easter, Passover and Ramadan this week and in coming weeks.

    Sign our petition to demand a moral stimulus package that addresses the roots of the double pandemic of poverty and COVID-19 and flood the White House, Senate and Congress with calls and emails.

   Thank you for taking care of yourselves and each other in these trying times.

Forward together today and always,
Rev. Dr. William Barber II and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis
Co-Chairs, The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival
April 4, 2020

Did you miss it? See highlights from our recent forums on cable TV Brooklyn Public Access (BRIC) or on YouTube

BFP’s “War No More” program on 2nd Tues each month, and Thursday the same week, 8 am & 10 pm on BRIC (Brooklyn Public Network, Brooklyn Free Speech, Ch. 2) You can view it several ways:
See it on Cable: Verizon FiOS 43; Optimum 68; Spectrum 1996; RCN 83
You can watch at your convenience on BFP’s YouTube channel.
Also check out the amazing video library of BFP and other events done by BFP member Ed Briody on his YouTube channnel

Self-Defense Classes for Teens, Adults, Transpeople, LGBTQ, and Transyouth Age 12–19
Center for Anti-Violence Education

The Center for Anti-Violence Education offers  self-defense classes for teen, adults, transpeople and LGBTQ.women and transyouth aged 12-19.
Check it out!

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